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Stony Brook University - School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences
Joseph D. Warren
Joe Warren's photo
Joseph D. Warren
Associate Professor
School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences
Stony Brook University

239 Montauk Hwy
Southampton, NY 11968

631-632-5045, joe.warren@stonybrook.edu

lab logo


Research: Bioacoustical Oceanography, Zooplankton Ecology

Scattering of sound by biological and physical oceanographic processes, Predator-prey relationships in zooplankton ecosystems,  Acoustic surveys of marine life, Biological and physical factors affecting zooplankton ecosystems, Antarctic krill ecosystem, Ocean observation systems.Zooplankton and nekton behavior and ecology. Survey design and technology.  Application of underwater acoustics to oceanographic problems. Use of sound by marine animals.  

Education
 Harvey Mudd College - B.S. Engineering with Honors, 1994
 MIT/WHOI Joint Program - Ph.D. Applied Ocean Sciences, 2001

Recent Lab Publications

J.L. Miksis-Olds, P.J. Stabeno, J.M. Napp, A.I. Pinchuk, J.A. Nystuen, J.D. Warren, S.L. Denes. 2013. Ecosystem response to a temporary sea ice retreat in the Bering Sea: Winter 2009. Progress in Oceanography. 111: 38-51. doi: 10.1016/j.pocean.2012.10.010. [.pdf]

J.N. Smith, P.H. Ressler, J.D. Warren. 2013. A distorted wave Born approximation target strength model for Bering Sea euphausiids. ICES Journal of Marine Science. 70(1): 204-214. doi: 10.1093/icesjms/fss140 [.pdf]

J.D. Warren. 2012. Counting critters in the sea using active acoustics. Acoustics Today. Volume 8. Issue 3. 25-34.
doi: 10.1121/1.4753914 [.pdf] [lay-language article]

P.H. Ressler, A. De Robertis, J.D. Warren, Joy N. Smith, S. Kotwicki. 2012. Developing an acoustic survey of euphausiids to understand trophic interactions in the Bering Sea ecosystem. Deep Sea Research II. 65-70: 184-195. doi: 10.1016/j.dsr2.2012.02.015 [.pdf]

S.E. Parks, J.D. Warren, K. Stamieszkin, C.A. Mayo, D. Wiley. 2012. Dangerous dining: surface foraging of North Atlantic right whales increases risk of vessel collisions. Biology Letters. 8(1): 57-60. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2011.0578 [.pdf]

Announcements

Are you interested in joining the lab ?

We have openings for undergraduates, graduate students, and post-docs.
Our projects generally involve bioacoustics, zooplankton or fish ecology.
Please read this for more information.


ALES has branched into the world of passive acoustic monitoring in 2014. We deployed a passive acoustic recorder at two different reef sites on the north coast of Jamaica during Stony Brook University's winter-term Tropical Marine Ecology course. We'll be looking at whether there are differences in the two locations in terms of fish activity as well as human activity (fishing boats). You can also check out videos of this year's best student photos and some student (and faculty) invasive species removal activities (i.e. spearfishing lionfish).

becker defense image
Congratulations to Kaylyn Becker who received her Master's degree in December. Kaylyn collected the first measurements on the material properties (density and sound speed) of Humboldt squid, Pacific hake, two species of myctophids, and several different zooplankton species.  These data are critically important inputs into acoustic scattering models which are used by fisheries scientists to estimate standing stock of commercially important species like Pacific hake (which most people have eaten as a fast food fish sandwich or fish sticks).

Kaylyn's thesis has produced two manuscripts and both have already been submitted to journals for publication -- way to go Kaylyn!


lab.at.ballgame

The spring ALES lab outing to the Long Island Ducks game was a quacking success (except for those who had to study for finals.  The Ducks didn't win, but we have a new Titration Helmet (which came with popcorn in it) for the lab. Thanks to all the undergrads and grad students for a great semester of research.

I wrote a lay-language article for Acoustics Today [15 MB file!] about how active acoustics is used to assess fish and zooplankton. For those interested in a general overview to my research field, this is a great place to start.

Congratulations to former lab member, Joy Smith whose paper in the ICES Journal of Marine Science about developing a target strength model for Bering Sea euphausiids is the 2nd published paper from her Masters thesis.

The ALES group is back in NY getting ready for our next set of projects and working on analyzing data from our recent projects in Australia (working with the SURFAH group), Alaska, the NE Pacific, and Antarctica, catching up on sample processing, paper and report writing, and -maybe- sneaking in some surf if we get some decent waves here in Long Island. Joe recently traveled to Penn State to teach the active acoustics section of the SeaBASS week-long graduate course in bioacoustics.

Prof. Peterson and I had another great group of students in our winter term course MAR 388: Tropical Marine Ecology (read all about it in this year's  course blog).

Check out our lab blog from our past several research cruises in the Pacific Ocean (Aug 2012) and in Antarctica (Nov/Dec 2010 and 2011).

Recent presentations by members of our lab include: 2012 Ocean Sciences meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah (February 2012);  ICES WGFAST meeting in Reykjavik, Iceland and shortly afterwards to the Acoustic Challenges in Aquatic Ecosystem Assessment Workshop sponsored by the Acoustical Society of America and the American Fisheries Society in Seattle, WA (both May 2011); the 5th International Zooplankton Production Symposium  in Pucon, Chile (March 2011).  It was a great meeting with ~ 300 zooplankton scientists from around the globe in attendance. I also found a local bakery which made alfajores which were delicious.

Congratulations to former lab member, Joy Smith whose work for her Masters thesis on the variability of material properties of Bering Sea zooplankton was published in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America.

Congratulations to former lab member, Krissy Forman whose work for her Masters thesis on the variability of material properties of zooplankton and nekton was published in the ICES Journal of Marine Science.

                                  Attention Stony Brook undergraduate MAR/MVB/ENS majors:                                  

I am looking for students to assist in the analysis of zooplankton samples from Cape Cod and Antarctica. You will be able to receive academic credit or pay for working in my lab. If interested, please contact me.

Check out some summaries of what folks are currently working on as well as past projects




www.stonybrook.edu